///////////////////// Site Slogans ////////// &name1=AFROSCAN &name2= INTERNATIONAL LIMITED ///////////////////// Buttons Name ////////// &menu1=Home &menu2=About Us &menu3=History of Herbs &menu4=Botanical Plants &menu5=Wonders in Plants &menu6=Contact Us ///////////////////// Mail File Config ////////// &mail_file=mail.php& ///////////// home //////////// &home_txt1=You're Welcome! &home_img1=images/third1.jpg& &home_img2=images/index2.jpg& align="right" &home_img3=images/index3.jpg& &home_txt2= &home_txt3=INTRODUCTION &home_txt4="The Magic of Natural Harbs!" AfroScan International Ltd is specialized in the worldwide supply of raw botanical plants intended for the phytopharmaceutical cosmetical and nutritional industries. All our products come from pristine environment (grown/collected) by trained botanists, employing sustainable methods of harvesting and observing good environmental practices. It is therefore, our interest to work closely with Extracting Companies, potential buyers and stock Brokers to market our export plants, whereby price quotations are negotiable depending on Terms of Trade, Terms of payment, Quantity, Order and Delivery Schedules. We prefer SUPPLY AGREEMENT on Bulk purchases and continuous supply in the form of raw plants, semi-processed or processed. We send samples up to 500grms of some of our products, however, it is our company policy, buyers to pay for courrier and postage of free samples on request. We supply smaller quantities and Bulk orders to all Destinations in the World. We supply Free on Board (FOB) however, we also can supply on CIF. For quality certification, we work closely with SGS and any certification company a Buyer determines to satisfy our clientele. With our Network with other African Suppliers, We link buying companies to other suppliers within Africa to facilitate trade in products we can not supply. Therefore, we will welcome your product enquiry not listed on our Company product profile. OUR NORM IS ALWAYS GOOD SERVICE TO OUR BUYERS WHOM WE SERVE PROMPTLY, QUALITATIVELY AND OPENLY. &home_txt5= &home_txt6= &home_txt7= &home_txt8= &home_txt9= &home_txt10= &home_txt11= &home_txt12=Larger View &home_readmore_title1=Home #1 &home_readmore_title2=Home #2 &home_readmore_title3=Introduction &home_readmore_txt2= &home_readmore_txt3=AfroScan International Ltd. is specialized in the worldwide supply of raw botanical plants intended for the phytopharmaceutical cosmetical and nutritional industries. All our products come from pristine environment (grown/collected) by trained botanists, employing sustainable methods of harvesting and observing good environmental practices. It is therefore, our interest to work closely with Extracting Companies, potential buyers and stock Brokers to market our export plants, whereby price quotations are negotiable depending on Terms of Trade, Terms of payment, Quantity, Order and Delivery Schedules. We prefer SUPPLY AGREEMENT on Bulk purchases and continuous supply in the form of raw plants, semi-processed or processed. We send samples up to 500grms of some of our products, however, it is our company policy, buyers to pay for courrier and postage of free samples on request. We supply smaller quantities and Bulk orders to all Destinations in the World. We supply Free on Board (FOB) however, we also can supply on CIF. For quality certification, we work closely with SGS and any certification company a Buyer determines to satisfy our clientele. With our Network with other African Suppliers, We link buying companies to other suppliers within Africa to facilitate trade in products we can not supply. Therefore, we will welcome your product enquiry not listed on our Company product profile. OUR NORM IS ALWAYS GOOD SERVICE TO OUR BUYERS WHOM WE SERVE PROMPTLY, QUALITATIVELY AND OPENLY. i ///////////// about //////////// &about_txt1=AfroScan &about_txt2=AfroScan Logo &about_txt3=OUR REGISTRATIONS &about_txt4= &about_txt5=OUR PROFILE &about_txt6=Company History &about_txt7=Name: AfroScan International Limited, Year Registered: 1977 Incorporated: 1997 vide Certificate of incorporation Nr. 32526, Ordinance (Cap. 212) and that the Company is Limited. Business Type: Growers and Collectors of Botanical Plants for Industry, Number of Employees: 20 - 50, Annual Sales: USD 500,000.00 - 1,000,000.00, CEO: B, Rwezaura Mr. Our Head Office is situated at: 2nd Floor Libya / Mosque Street Consolidated Investment building P.O. Box 1959 Dar Es Salaam Republic of Tanzania East Africa. Mob: + 255 (0) 686 474 194 + 250 784 525 807 Fax: + 22 211 5718 E-mail: brwezaura@afroscaninternational.com brwezaura@yahoo.com Skype: rwezaura.bonny Website: www.afroscaninternational.com &about_txt8=READ MORE &about_txt9=Who we are and What we do &about_txt10=AfroScan International Ltd. is specialized in the worldwide supply of raw botanical plants intended for the phytopharmaceutical cosmetical and nutritional industries. All our products come from pristine environment (grown/collected) by trained botanists, employing sustainable methods of harvesting and observing good environmental practices. It is therefore, our interest to work closely with Extracting Companies, potential buyers and stock Brokers to market our export plants, whereby price quotations are negotiable depending on Terms of Trade, Terms of payment, Quantity, Order and Delivery Schedules. We prefer SUPPLY AGREEMENT on Bulk purchases and continuous supply in the form of raw plants, semi-processed or processed. We send samples up to 500grms of some of our products, however, it is our company policy, buyers to pay for courrier and postage of free samples on request. We supply smaller quantities and Bulk orders to all Destinations in the World. We supply Free on Board (FOB) however, we also can supply on CIF. For quality certification, we work closely with SGS and any certification company a Buyer determines to satisfy our clientele. With our Network with other African Suppliers, We link buying companies to other suppliers within Africa to facilitate trade in products we can not supply. Therefore, we will welcome your product enquiry not listed on our Company product profile. OUR NORM IS ALWAYS GOOD SERVICE TO OUR BUYERS WHOM WE SERVE PROMPTLY, QUALITATIVELY AND OPENLY. &about_img1=images/xx.jpg& &about_img2=images/second2.jpg& &about_img3=images/second3.jpg& &about_readmore_title1=Our Registration &about_readmore_title2=Our Profile &about_readmore_title3=Our Particulars &about_readmore_txt1=Name: AfroScan International Limited, Year Registered: 1977 Incorporated: 1997 vide Certificate of incorporation Nr. 32526, Ordinance (Cap. 212) and that the Company is Limited. Business Type: Growers and Collectors of Botanical Plants for Industry, Number of Employees: 20 - 50, Annual Sales: USD 500,000.00 - 1,000,000.00, CEO: B, Rwezaura Mr. Our Head Office is situated at:+ 1081 / 1 Suite #6 Vijana Building Lumumba / Morogoro Road P.O. Box 1959 Dar Es Salaam Republic of Tanzania East Africa. Mob: + 255 (0) 686 474 194 (Start numbers with plus sign) Fax: + 255 22 211 5718 E-mail: brwezaura@afroscaninternational.com brwezaura@yahoo.com Website: www.afroscaninternational.com &about_readmore_txt2=Name: AfroScan International Limited, Year Registered: 1977 Incorporated: 1997 vide Certificate of incorporation Nr. 32526, Ordinance (Cap. 212) and that the Company is Limited. Business Type: Growers and Collectors of Botanical Plants for Industry, Number of Employees: 20 - 50, Annual Sales: USD 500,000.00 - 1,000,000.00, CEO: B, Rwezaura Mr. Our Head Office is situated at: 1081 / 1 Suite #6 Vijana Building Lumumba / Morogoro Road P.O. Box 1959 Dar Es Salaam Republic of Tanzania East Africa. Mob: + 255 (0) 686 474 194 Fax: + 255 22 211 5718 E-mail: brwezaura@afroscaninternational.com brwezaura@yahoo.com Website: www.afroscaninternational.com &about_readmore_txt3=Name: AfroScan International Limited, Year Registered: 1977 Incorporated: 1997 vide Certificate of incorporation Nr. 32526, Ordinance (Cap. 212) and that the Company is Limited. Business Type: Growers and Collectors of Botanical Plants for Industry, Number of Employees: 20 - 50, Annual Sales: USD 500,000.00 - 1,000,000.00, CEO: B, Rwezaura Mr. Our Head Office is situated at: 1081 / 1 Suite #6 Vijana Building Lumumba / Morogoro Road P.O. Box 1959 Dar Es Salaam Republic of Tanzania East Africa. Mob: + 255 (0) 686 474 194 Fax: + 255 22 211 5718 E-mail: brwezaura@afroscaninternational.com brwezaura@yahoo.com Website: www.afroscaninternational.com ///////////// services //////////// &services_txt1=History &services_txt2=AfroScan International Ltd.
"we believe in natural herbs"
Perhaps the most wonderful is not only that they are so varied and beautiful, but that they are also so clever at feeding themselves. Plants are autotrophs — "self nourishers." &services_txt3=FLOWERS & PLANTS &services_txt4=The Nutritional Value and health benefits of herbs.Nutritional healing herbs being forms of food perform many healing functions in the body. The health benefits of herbs are based on their chemical and nutrient content (natural vitamin consumption). The greatest nutritional value of herbs is that they are loaded with antioxidants, those essential nutrients that keep our bodies in check. But you may not be getting the health benefits of herbs as much as you could if you do not know the chemical and nutrient content. For example, alfalfa. It is high in chlorophyll and nutrients. Vitamins A, B complex, C, D, E, K, U, biotin, calcium, choline, inositol, iron, magnesium, PABA, phosphorus, potassium, protein, sodium, sulfur and tryptophan (amino acid). Additional health benefits of herbs include knowing how well they work in their several different forms. The most common, convenient and preferred is capsule form. But they are also effective in the form of teas and herbal extracts.There are many forms of herbal preparations. Also learn the actions of herbs to improve your understanding of how herbs work. Medicinal health benefits of herbs and their uses. &services_txt5=Botanical Flowers &services_txt6=PLANTS &services_txt7=Name: AfroScan International Limited, Year Registered: 1977 &services_txt8=Full History &services_txt9=...History Continues &services_txt10=AfroScan International Ltd. is specialized in the worldwide supply of raw botanical plants intended for the phytopharmaceutical cosmetical and nutritional industries. All our products come from pristine environment (grown/collected) by trained botanists, employing sustainable methods of harvesting and observing good environmental practices. &services_img1=images/third1.jpg& &services_img2=images/second3.jpg& &services_img3=images/third1.jpg& &services_readmore_title1=Botanical Flowers &services_readmore_title2=History of Herbs &services_readmore_txt1=Name: The Nutritional Value and health benefits of herbs. Nutritional healing herbs being forms of food perform many healing functions in the body. The health benefits of herbs are based on their chemical and nutrient content (natural vitamin consumption). The greatest nutritional value of herbs is that they are loaded with antioxidants, those essential nutrients that keep our bodies in check. But you may not be getting the health benefits of herbs as much as you could if you do not know the chemical and nutrient content. For example, alfalfa. It is high in chlorophyll and nutrients. Vitamins A, B complex, C, D, E, K, U, biotin, calcium, choline, inositol, iron, magnesium, PABA, phosphorus, potassium, protein, sodium, sulfur and tryptophan (amino acid). Additional health benefits of herbs include knowing how well they work in their several different forms. The most common, convenient and preferred is capsule form. But they are also effective in the form of teas and herbal extracts.There are many forms of herbal preparations. Also learn the actions of herbs to improve your understanding of how herbs work. Medicinal health benefits of herbs and their uses. &services_readmore_txt2=Name: AfroScan International Limited, &services_readmore_txt3=Name: AfroScan International Limited, ///////////// products //////////// &products_txt1=Botanical Plants List &products_txt2= 1. a) Capsicum annum Fruit (cayenne). b) Paprika. 2. Gymnema sylvestre Root, leaves seed (Cow plant) 3. Centella asiatica Leaves 4. Boswellia Daizielli Gum Copal 5. Commiphora molmol 6. Commiphora mukul 7. Valeriana officinalis 8. Harpagophytum procumbans 9. Pelargonium sidoides 10. Hoodia gordonii (Spiky Cucaulent) 11. St Johnswort 12. Artemisia annua leaves 13. Moringa pterygospema seed 14. Carissa edulis Roots 15. Cinnamomum zeylanicum Bark, leaves 16. Adansaonia digitata 17. Abrus precatorius 18. Gymnema sylvestre Root, leaves Seed 19. Ancistrocladus abbreviate leaves, seed 20. Deunettia tri Seed 21. Hunteria eburnean 22. Duparguetia orchidacea Bark. 23. Adhotoda robusta Leaves, Bark 24. Calotropis procera Leaves, Seed 25. Ximenia Americana seed, Root, Bark 26. Clitoria ternatea 27. Rothmania longiflora Roots, Bark, Seed 28. Uapaca guineensis Seed, Bark, Root 29. Sesbania grandifolia Seed, Leaf, Bark 30. Phycnocoma cornuta Bark, Leaf 31. Maesopis eminii Seed, Bark 32. Malacantha alnifolia Leaves, Seed 33. Dyschoriste perrottetii Seed 34. Eriosema glomeratum Seed 35. Massularia acuminata Seed 36. Euadenia eminens Seed, Root 37. Turraea vogelii Seed, Leaves 38. Cissus populnea Leaves Theory 39. Dichapetalum toxicarium Bark, Seed 40. Entada abyssinica Seed, Root Leaves 41. Allophyllus africanus Seed, Root, Barks 42. Markhamia lutea/tomentosa Bark 43. Uvaria chamea Seed, Root 44. Sterculia tragacantha Bark 45. Bersama abyssinica Bark, Seed, Root 46. Canthium glabriflorum Bark, Root, Seed 47. Capparis sp. Root, Seed, Bark 48. Cordial senegalensis Seed, Leaves 49. Chrysophyllum africanum Bark, Seed 50. Parkia bicolor Seed, Bark, Leaves 51. Flacourtia flavescens Seed 52. Gardenia sp. Seed, Root 53. Gmelina arborea Seed, Leaves, roots 54. Grewia bicolor Roots, Seed, Leaves 55. Leea guineensis Roots, Seeds, Leaves 56. Maytenus senegalensis Seed, Leaves 57. Premna hispida Roots, Leaves, Seed 58. Voacanga Africana Seeds 59. Oncoba spinosa Seed, Root, Leaves 60. Taberneamontana sp. Seed, Bark 61. Treculia African Seed, Bark 62. Xylopia quitasii Seed 63. Alstonia boonei Bark 64. Capparis erythrocarpos roots 65. Catharanthus roseus roots 66. Centella asiatica Leaves 67. Crossopteryx febrifuga Bark 68. Erythropheleum suaveolens leaves 69. Holarrhena floribunda 70. Moringa oleifera Seed, Leaves, Barks, Roots 71. Plumbago zeylanica whole plant 72. Premna hispida Leaves 73. Zanthoxylum xanthoxyloides Bark/Roots 74. Rhizopora racemosa Bark 75. Clausena anisata Bruised Leaves 76. Piper guineense Pulverised seeds 77. Datura stramonum Pulverised Seeds 78. Azadirachta indica Seeds, Leaves, Roots, Barks 79. Melia azedarach Seed Fat 80. Solanum nigrum Leaves 81. Argemone maxicana Seed Oil 82. Evolvulus alsinoides Whole Plant 83. Hyptis spicigera Whole Plant 84. Dioscosireophyllum cumminsii Monellin 85. Thaumatococcus daniellii Thaumautin 86. Synsepalum dulcificum Miraculin 87. Licania elaeosperma (substitute for lin seed oil) 88. Afzelkia African 89. Allanblackia parvialora (or floribunda) 90. Aladirachta indica 91. Caloncoba enchinata 92. Caloncoba glance 93. Chrysophyllum delevoyi 94. Hannoa unduiate 95. Hannoa klaineana 96. Avengia gabonensis 97. Jatropha curcas 98. Parinari curatellifolia 99. Pentadesma butyracelum 100. Pycnathus angolenses 101. Ricinodendron heudelotii 102. Trichilia emetic 103. Caesalpinia SPP 104. Ongokea gore 105. Picralima nitida 106. Ocimum virde 107. Boutyrespemum parkii 108. Afraegle paniculata 109. Ochna afzelii 110. Raphia hookeri 111. Trichilia roka 112. Secuidaca longepedunculata 113. Ricinus communis 114. Canarium schweinfurthii Gum copal 115. Daniellia oliveri Gum Copal 116. Daniellia ogea Gum Copal 117. Copaiba salicounda Gum Copal 118. Pellegrinodendron diphyllum Gum Copal 119. Trachyllbium verrucosum Gum Copal 120. Boswellia daizielli Gum Copal 121. Guibourita ehie Gum Copal 122. Balanites Wilsoniana Gum Copal 123. Afraegle paniculata Gum Copal 124. Albizia adianthifolia Gum Copal 125. Antidesma venesum Gum Copal 126. Bauhinia purpurea Gum Copal 127. Burkea African Gum Copal 128. Spondias monbin Gum Copal 129. Tamarindus indica Gum Copal 130. Pterocarpus santalinoides Gum Copal 131. Commiphora Africana Gum Copal 132. Munsanga cecreopiodies 133. Tetracera alnifoila 134. Tetracera potatoria 135. Cissus populnea 136. Anacardium occidentale Seeds 137. Annona muricata 138. Balanities aegyptica 139. Bombax buonopozenze Fruit 140. Dialium guineense Fruit 141. Entada purseatha Stem 142. Parkia biglobosa 143. Parkia clappertoiana Bark 144. Scierocarva birrea fruit Juice 145. Treculia Africana seeds 146. Beilschemiedia mannii Flowers 147. Cananga adorata Sepals 148. Canarium schwenfurthii Olea-Resin 149. Cinnamomum camphora Bark/Leaves 150. Cinnamomum zeylanicum Bark/Leaves 151. Commiphora Africana resin 152. Cyperus articulates Rhizomes 153. Cyperus rotundus Rhizomes 154. Hyptia suaveolens leaves 155. Lippa multiflora Leaves 156. Vetiveria zizanioides Roots 157. Renealmia battenbergiana whole plant 158. Ocimum canum Leaves 159. Aframomum melegueta seed 160. Pachypodianthium staudtii Bark 161. Lawsonia inermis 162. Lecaniodiscus cupanioides 163. Macrosphyra longistyla 164. Oxyanthus speciosus 165. Leucas deflexa 166. Daniella oliveri 167. Abrus precatorius 168. Acacia albida 169. Ageratum compoides 170. Amantia sp. 171. Ascelpias curassavica 172. Burkea Africana 173. Calotropis procera 174. Corchorus olitorius 175. Crotalaria pollida 176. crotalaria 177. retusa 178. Croton tiglium 179. Datura metel 180. Datura stramonium 181. Durantia repens 182. Erythropheleum suaveolens 183. Galerina spp. 184. Lepiota sp. 185. Mundulea sericea 186. Habropetalum dawei 187. Hura crepitans 188. Phseolus luntus 189. Physostigma venenosum 190. Paullinia pinnata 191. Thevetia peruviana 192. Ximenia Americana 193. Strophantus kombe seeds 194. Arachis hypogaea seeds 195. Cocos nucifera Seeds 196. Elaeis guineensis seed & Fruits 197. Avengia gabonensis Seeds 198. Lophira lanceolata Seeds 199. Mammea Africana Seeds 200. Pentadessma butyraceum Seeds 201. Sesamum indicum Seeds 202. Tieghella heckelii Seeds 203. Vitellaria paradoxa Seeds 204. Cissampelos owariensis 205. Quassia amara 206. Desmodium adscendens 207. Adianthum spp. 208. Momordica charantia 209. Phyllanthus niruri 210. Mirabilis jalapa 211. Cassia accidentalis 212. Stachytarpheta spp 213. Paullinia cupana 214. Physelis andulata 215. Bidens pilosa 216. Scoparia dulcis 217. Centella asiastica 218. Mallotus oppositifolia 219. Mitragyna sp 220. Cocos nuicfera fruit 221. Aspillia sp 222. Argyreia Nevosa 223. Combretum micranthum 224. Bambusa arundinacea 225. Corynathe sp 226. Mucana pruriens 227. Walthoria Indica 228. Leonotis nepetifolia 229. Harungana madascarienses 230. Catharanthus roseus 231. Okuobaka Bark. 232. Erythroxylum mannii 233. Jasmimum sambac 234. Lippia adoensis 235. Lippia multiflora 236. Acacia albida 237. Afraegle paniculata 238. Anthocleista nobilis 239. Cocos nucifera 240. Dracaena arborea 241. Erythrina milbraedii 242. Sterculia rhinopetala 243. Adansonia digitata 244. Mammea Africana 245. Blighia sapida 246. Bussea occidentalis Pod Ashes 247. Theobroma cacao Pod Ashes 248. Prosopis Africana Pod Ashes 249. Samanea dinklagei Pod Ashes 250. Xylia evansii Pod Ashes 251. Trumfetta cordifolia Pod Ashes 252. Annona muricata 253. Cocos nuicfera Fruit 254. Vernonia nigritana (milk coagulant) 255. Aframomum melegueta Seeds 256. Citrus species Fruit Rind 257. Zingeiber offinale Rhizomes 258. Cananga odorata Petals 259. Cymbopogon nardus Leaves 260. Cymbopogon citradus Leaves 261. Hyptis suaveolens Leaves 262. Cinnamomum camphora Bark, Leaves 263. cinnamomum 264. zeylanicum Bark, Leaves 265. Vetiveria zizanioides Roots 266. Ocimum gratissimum 267. Piper guineense 268. Hoslundia opposite 269. Eugenia calyophillate 270. Corynanthe pachycers Bark 271. Penianthus zenkeri roots 272. Sphenocentrum jollyanum Roots 273. Paullina pinnata Roots 274. Cyperus escuentus Nuts 275. Massularia acuminate roots 276. Carissa edulis roots 277. Rauvolfia vomitoria Roots, Barks 278. Tribulus terrestris Whole Plant 279. Cleame viscose roots 280. Anthonotha macraphyll Red 281. Strychnos afzelii Red 282. Phyllam reticylatus Red 283. Bix orellana Pinkish Red 284. Cochlospermum tinctorium Green 285. Indigofera arecta Indigo 286. Lanchocarpus cyanescens Indigo blue 287. Lanchocarpus laxiflorus Indigo Blue 288. Tamarindus indica Brown 289. Lawsonia inermis Pinkish Red 290. Anacardium occidentale (leaves) Yellow 291. Anogeissus leiocarpus (leaves) Yellow 292. Enantia polycarpa (bark, extract) Yellow 293. Gossypium arboretum (flowers) yellow 294. Punica granatum (Fruit, Bark) Yellow 295. Pterocarpus erinaceus (bark, wool, roots) Purple 296. Parkia biglobosa Indigo Blue 297. Cremaspora triflora Blue 298. Clitoria ternatea Blue 299. Saba florida Blue 300. Buchnera leptostachya Blue/Black 301. Gardenia vogelii Blue/Black 302. Khaya senegalensis brown 303. Entandrophragma angolense brown 304. Trema orientalis brown 305. Maesa lanceolata Brown 306. Afrormosia elata 307. Afzelia Africana 308. Afzelia bella 309. Albizia ferruginea 310. Albizia zygia 311. Alchornea cordifolia 312. Alchornea floribunda 313. Allanblackia floribunda 314. Alstonia boonei 315. Amphimas pterocarpoides 316. Aningeria altissima 317. Aningeria robusta 318. Anopyxis klaineana 319. Antiaris toxicaria 320. Antrocaryon micraster 321. Berlinia spp 322. Bombax brevicuspe 323. Bombax buonopozense 324. Canarium schweinfurthii 325. Cedrela odorata 326. Ceiba pentandra 327. Celtis mildbraedii 328. Celtis zenkeri 329. Chlorophora excels 330. Chlorophora regia 331. Chrysophyllum aibidum 332. Chrysophyllum giganteum 333. Chrysophyllum subnudum 334. Cistanthera papaverifera 335. Clausena anisata 336. Cleistopholis patents 337. Combretodendron africanum 338. Cola boxiana 339. Cola digitata 340. Cola nitada 341. Copaifera salikounda 342. Cordial millenii 343. Cordial platythyrsa 344. Cylicodiscus gabunensis 345. Cynometra ananta 346. Daniellia ogea 347. Daniellia ogea 348. Daniellia thurifera 349. Dialium aubrevillei 350. Diospyros spp. 351. Distemonanthus benthamianus 352. Dumoria heckelii 353. Entandrophragma angolense 354. Entandrophragma candollei 355. Entandrophragma cylindricum 356. Entandrophragma utile 357. Erythrophleum africanum 358. Erythrophleum guineense 359. Erythrophleum ivorense 360. Ficus spp. 361. Gilbertiodendron spp. 362. Gmelina arborea 363. Guarea cedrata 364. Guarea thompsonii 365. Guibourtia ehie 366. Heritiera utilis 367. Holoptelea grandis 368. Khaya ivorensis 369. Klainedoxa gabonensis 370. Lannea wewitschii 371. Lophira alata 372. Lophira pocera 373. Lovoa klaineana 374. Lovoa trichilioides 375. Mammea Africana 376. Manilkara spp. 377. Mansonia altissima 378. Milicia excelsa 379. Milicia regia 380. Mimusops heckelii 381. Morus mesozygia 382. Nauclea diderrichii 383. Nesogordonia papaverifera 384. Okoubaka aubrevillei 385. Ongokea gore 386. Parinari excelsa 387. Parinari holstii 388. Parkia bicolor 389. Pentaclethra macrophylla 390. Pericopsis elata 391. Petersia Africana 392. Petersianthus macrocarpus 393. Piptadenia Africana 394. Piptadeniastrum africanum 395. Pterygota macrocarpa 396. Pycnanthus angolensis 397. Sacoglottis gabonensis 398. Sarcocephalus diderrichii 399. Scottellia coriacea 400. Scottellia klaineana 401. Sterculia oblonga 402. Sterculia rhinopetala 403. Strombosia glaucescens 404. Stombosia pustulata 405. Tarrietia utilis 406. Tectona grandis 407. Terminalia ivorensis 408. Terminalia superba 409. Tieghemelia heckelii 410. Terminalia Sericea Rootbarks 411. Ginkgo biloba 412. Cimicifuga Racemosa 413. Commiphora Mukul 414. Piper methysticum 415. Urtica Dioica 416. Passiflora Incalnata 417. Cucurbita Species 418. Valeriana Officinalis 419. Salix Aba 420. Dioscorea Villosa 421. Pygeum Africanum (Prunus Africana) &products_txt3=OUR SUPPLY TERMS &products_txt4=We prefer SUPPLY AGREEMENT on Bulk purchases and continuous supply in the form of raw plants, semi-processed or processed. We send samples up to 500grms of some of our products, however, it is our company policy, buyers to pay for courrier and postage of free samples on request. We supply smaller quantities and Bulk orders to all Destinations in the World. We supply Free on Board (FOB) however, we also can supply on CIF. For quality certification, we work closely with SGS and any certification company a Buyer determines to satisfy our clientele. With our Network with other African Suppliers, We link buying companies to other suppliers within Africa to facilitate trade in products we can not supply. Therefore, we will welcome your product enquiry not listed on our Company product profile. &products_txt5=Plants Gallery &products_txt6=Consult our specialists on how best to use this plant &products_txt7=READ MORE &products_txt8=Consult our specialists on how best to use this plant &products_txt9=READ MORE &products_txt10=Consult our specialists on how best to use this plant &products_txt11=READ MORE &products_txt12=Consult our specialists on how best to use this plant &products_txt13=READ MORE &products_txt14=Consult our specialists on how best to use this plant &products_txt15=READ MORE &products_img1=images/index3.jpg& &products_img2=images/second2.jpg& &products_img3=images/index2.jpg& &products_img4=images/index3.jpg& &products_img5=images/fourth5.jpg& &products_readmore_title1=Nutritional Value &products_readmore_title2=Health Benefits &products_readmore_title3=Living with Herbs &products_readmore_title4=Medicinal Herbs &products_readmore_title5=Herbs Alternatives &products_readmore_txt1=The Nutritional Value and health benefits of herbs. Nutritional healing herbs being forms of food perform many healing functions in the body. The health benefits of herbs are based on their chemical and nutrient content (natural vitamin consumption). The greatest nutritional value of herbs is that they are loaded with antioxidants, those essential nutrients that keep our bodies in check. But you may not be getting the health benefits of herbs as much as you could if you do not know the chemical and nutrient content. For example, alfalfa. It is high in chlorophyll and nutrients. Vitamins A, B complex, C, D, E, K, U, biotin, calcium, choline, inositol, iron, magnesium, PABA, phosphorus, potassium, protein, sodium, sulfur and tryptophan (amino acid). Additional health benefits of herbs include knowing how well they work in their several different forms. The most common, convenient and preferred is capsule form. But they are also effective in the form of teas and herbal extracts.There are many forms of herbal preparations. Also learn the actions of herbs to improve your understanding of how herbs work. Medicinal health benefits of herbs and their uses. Medicinal health benefits of herbs is that they contain a broad range of health enhancing properties. Each medicinal plant has a primary function in the treatment of a particular illness. Each individual plant has many different actions. The actions depend on the active ingredients, or nutrient content. For example, the primary function of alfalfa is used for digestive disorders and the kidneys. But also helpful for colon disorders, anemia, diabetes, arthritis and ulcers. It alkalizes the body and detoxifies, especially the liver. It promotes pituitary gland function and contains an antifungal agent. Knowing which part of each plant to use is also important. For instance, medicinal rhubarb - its roots are medicinal while its leaves are poisonous and yet its stalks are used in recipes for making pies. If you find several medicinal uses of plants for a particular disorder, alternate them to maximize the health benefits of herbs. When taken in combination they tend to be more powerful. This is referred to as herbal compounding, which alters the individual actions of the herbals and minimizes causing any serious harm of unusually strong plants. &products_readmore_txt2=The health benefits of herbs; whether used to improve health or heal wounds, work best used as nutritional supplements. Herbs feed every part of the body. Our continued interest in herbal nutrition supplements is knowing the health benefits of herbs. They improve your health due to their vitamin and mineral content. They provide the essential elements and dietary minerals lacking in our bodies. The body needs reserves of these elements to cope with the everyday demands of life. Often the origin of disease is due to nutritional deficiencies. The best way to supply the lack of nutrition in a diet is with natural healing herbs. They restore the integrity of the body, correcting problems instead of suppressing them. &products_readmore_txt3=Looking to get back to a more healthier way of living? Then why not create your own organic herb garden! And it’s easy to get started; using simple, easy to follow steps you can create your own successful organic herb garden. Culinary, medical, aromatic and botanical herbs have been cultivated and used for thousand of years and remains a firmly rooted tradition worldwide. And certainly historical records exist to show very early knowledge of herb cultivation in civilisation of the past. Today, more and more people concerned about the routine use of chemical fertilizers by commercial growers/producers are looking to get back to a healthier way of living. Creating an organic herb garden at home would be an important step to help anyone wishing to develop a healthier diet/lifestyle. &products_readmore_txt4=Top Medicinal Herbs You Can Grow In Your Backyard! With plentiful information about medicinal herbs online and the benefits of medicinal herbs well documented, many health-conscious gardeners are becoming interested in growing herbs in their gardens. Many of the herbs commonly used as food spices also have medicinal qualities so that working healthful herbs into your garden produce is much easier than you might expect. They Look Pretty, Grow Well, and Are Good for You An herb garden can be a fragrant and attractive addition to your backyard. Many herbs are very hardy and require little in the way of care, a definite plus for the busy gardener. Many of these flowers and small shrubs that smell good, taste good, and look nice are also medicinal herbs and plants. In fact, many of the most common and easily recognizable of these, substances often thought of simply as spices, are actually medicinal herbal plants with potential healing and preventative properties. Consider the brief list below. BASIL The annual herb basil grows low to the ground at a height of about eighteen inches. Individual plants should be about a foot apart. Basil has a strong, sweet smell and grows best in hot, dry conditions. As a seasoning for cooking, basil leaves are normally taken straight from the plant, washed and added to the given dish at the last moment. Basil will lose its flavor quickly when cooked. However, usefulness does not end at the kitchen door for basil. Medicinal herb properties for basil include memory enhancement and a calming and strengthening of the nervous system. As an expectorant, basil will clear the throat and lungs and the juice will treat ear aches and fungal infections. An infusion or tea made from basil leaves will also settle gastric distress. GARLIC The perennial, garlic, which is closely related to onions is cultivated for its underground “head,” a grouping of perhaps as many as a dozen pungent garlic cloves. To cultivate garlic, which grows in sprout-like clumps, plant individual cloves two inches deep in moist soil. In hot climates, keep your garlic plants as wet as possible. At four months the long, spout-like foliage of garlic will die back signaling that it is time to dig up the cloves. Consumed either raw or used in foods, garlic is an extremely healthy herb. It has been found to lower fatty deposits in arteries by as much as fifty percent and to inhibit the formation of clots. It is an extremely strong herb and you can expect to have “garlic breath” after eating the cloves even when diced and cooked in a recipe. (Perhaps this is as good a reason as any to also plant refreshing mint in your backyard herb garden!) LAVENDER There are between 25 and thirty species of the herb lavender, which is a member of the mint family. All are hardy perennial plants with gray foliage and fragrant purplish leaves. (The height and degree of spread varies by species.) Lavender dries easily and is often used in sachets to freshen linen drawers, as an ingredient in potpourri, or as part of holiday wreaths and other rustic decorations. (Bundles of lavender are also said to ward off insects.) For beekeepers, lavender flowers will yield excellent honey and oil extracted from lavender is both an antiseptic and a calming agent when used for aromatherapy. The oil applied to the temples and wrists or sachets placed inside a bed pillow will also help headaches and insomnia. When mixed with rosewater, witch hazel, or simply water itself, rosemary oil will treat acne and other skin irritations. MARJORAM In the southern United States marjoram is a perennial but in northern states is regarded as an annual. Marjoram grows to approximately one foot in height and individual plants should be spaced six inches apart. The plant is grown solely for the leaves which are cut when the plant begins to flower and are allowed to slowly dry in a shady location Marjoram has many medicinal properties and is often used as an essential oil. It is a balancing and soothing herb with sedative and calming properties. It will lower the blood pressure, ease respiratory and stomach problems, cure headache, and tastes fantastic with lamb, fish, salads and soups. MINT There are literally several hundred varieties of mint with peppermint, spearmint, and pineapple mint being the most common and popular. All are easy to grow and tend to reach heights of two feet with an overall sprawling appearance. Of all the purported benefits of medicinal herbs, those attributed to mints are perhaps the most documented. Not only do mints taste good, but they have a number of medicinal properties, in particular soothing gastric upsets. Peppermint used as a tea is particularly effective for stomach complaints, but some people report peppermint makes their heartburn worse. For children with colic or an “upset tummy” spearmint should be used because it is milder. (For adults spearmint has little benefit beyond a pleasant taste and a breath freshening effect.) When combined with rosemary, mint oil is a good hair conditioner and will control dandruff. PARSLEY The leaves of the bright green biennial, parsley, is often used as a seasoning or food garnish. Curly leaf parsley is the more decorative form while the flat leaf variety has a stronger flavor and is better for seasoning. Parsley is very easy to grow and will thrive in a pot on a window sill that gets lots of sunshine. Parsley should be kept wet. Known primarily for its properties as a diuretic, parsley should not be eaten in large quantities by those with kidney problems. Premenstrual women fighting water retention will gain a great benefit from parsley and it is also effective in lowering mild cases of high blood pressure. ROSEMARY some rosemary growing as high as two to three feet. Although it needs regular watering, rosemary is a hardy plant and will withstand intense heat if provided with a bit of shade during the day. While it tastes spicy and flavorful when added to food, especially chicken dishes, rosemary also works as a mild analgesic. It will treat headaches and poor circulation and can even be used as a natural breath freshener. Rosemary oil is a very effective hair conditioner and anti-dandruff remedy. Traditionally rosemary has been thought to improve memory. WORMWOOD Often when people ask, “What is wormwood?” they will be told it is a popular landscaping plant. Certainly the gray-green leaves of the wormwood plant are attractive. The plant, which reaches a maximum height of about three feet, puts out yellow flowers in the summer. It is extremely bitter to the taste. When used for medicinal purposes, wormwood is usually mixed with peppermint or caraway and in that combination treats gastric distress and irritable bowel syndrome. In this fashion the three herbs are normally brewed as a tea. Wormwood should not be used for more than a month at a time and has actually been declared unsafe by the Food and Drug Administration because the plant contains thujone, which damages the liver. YARROW This erect perennial grows from two to three feet in height and puts out clusters of small white or pink flowers. Yarrow is extremely resistant to drought and is often planted in dry areas to control erosion. Also, because it is a fragrant plant, yarrow is also excellent to attract butterflies into your garden. Long used as a healing agent for cuts and abrasions, yarrow is both an astringent and a stimulant and has been used to treat everything from headaches to hemorrhoids. It will halt bleeding and will help bruises to heal more quickly. The essential oil extracted from yarrow will, when rubbed on the chest, sooth the congestion and body aches of both cold and flu. &products_readmore_txt5=Effective Herbal Alternatives To Valium And All Other Anxiety Related Drugs Interest in natural herbs for anxiety has been rising along with reports of their successful use in the treatment of mood disorders. As an alternative to traditional pharmaceuticals to treat anxiety, depression and herbs has been at the focus of much attention. Learn how to use natural healing herbs for you and your familyKava Kava the most commonly used herbal remedy for anxiety, is just one of many natural and herbal remedies currently being used in the treatment of mood and sleep disorders. Anxiety and Panic Attacks can be treated with Xanax prescription medication. Anxiety Medication Herbs Anxiety disorders are more common than people think, and research estimates that up to 6.5% of the population suffers from a diagnosable condition of anxiety or panic disorder. Herbs for anxiety are being used effectively by millions of people to help combat, reduce, and eliminate symptoms related to this condition as well. Herbal remedies are also being used effectively to help those with mild depression, insomnia, and helping people reduce stress. Listed below are some of the most popular anxiety herbs and herbal remedies that are currently used. Best Remedies and Natural Herbs For Anxiety There are some best remedies and natural herbs for anxiety such as follows Kava Kava (Piper methysticum) this is one of the most popular choices for the treatment of anxiety and insomnia; it is a powerful herb from the South Seas. It is used as an alternative to Valium and research studies have found that they both reduce anxiety equivalently, but there are no addictive side effects with the kava kava. Valerian The extract of valerian has been the treatment of choice for anxiety and insomnia throughout the world. It is a sedative and painkiller. Helpful in treating insomnia, Valerian is taken at bedtime to prevent panic attacks and is used as a replacement for tranquilizers. Ashwagandha this is the primary strengthening tonic in Ayurvedic medicine and is used to reduce stress and calm nerves. It is traditionally taken as a tincture (an alcoholic extract) twice a daily. Borage Juice this is used because it has a stimulating effect on the glandular system. It also acts as a general tonic and purifies the blood. Take 1 tbsp. with water daily for two weeks. Bugleweed is used as a nervine to calm and relax nerves. Make an infusion using one teaspoon of herb and one cup boiling water. You can also add lime or linden flowers to the infusion. California Poppy is used as an herbal tranquilizer. Take ½ teaspoon of tincture or two capsules 3-4 times a day or as directed in the product label. Catnip used as a nervine. Make an infusion using one ounce of herbs and one pint of boiling water. Cool before drinking. Chamomile this is used as a nervine. Boil one ounce of blossoms in one pint of water for fifteen minutes; strain and add honey to taste. Fennel- used to relieve anxiety-related gastrointestinal upsets, reduces flatulence, and abdominal tension, and relaxes the large intestine. Take it as a tea before or after meals. It has no known side effects. Feverfew used to calm nerves and treat migraines and anxiety-induced headaches. Infuse one ounce of herb in one pint of boiling water. Cool before drinking. Ginkgo Biloba used to improve circulation to the brain. It elevates the mood for those depressed, and often used as a natural antidepressant. Ginseng is used to treat anxiety. It is usually taken in combination with royal jelly and is a great energy booster and lifts the spirits. Take 1 tsp. of royal jelly in a cup of ginseng tea twice daily. Hops used to relieve insomnia and encourage sleep. To make a tea, boil one teaspoon of herb in one cup of water in a covered pot for ten minutes. Strain and flavor with honey and lemon to taste. You can also use it in making a sleep pillow. To make a sleep pillow, stuff a small pouch or pillow with hop flowers. Sprinkle a little alcohol on the herb to release the essential oils. ///////////// Support //////////// &support_txt1=Wonders in Plants &support_txt2=Of the many wonders of plants, perhaps the most wonderful is not only that they are so varied and beautiful, but that they are also so clever at feeding themselves. Plants are autotrophs — "self nourishers." Using only energy from the sun, they can take up all the nourishment they need — water, minerals, carbon dioxide — directly from the world around them to manufacture their own roots and stems, leaves and flowers, fruits and seeds. If something is missing from that simple mix — if they don't get enough water, for example, or if the soil is lacking some of the minerals they need — they grow poorly or die. But their diet is limited, a few minerals, some H2O, some CO2, and energy from the sun. Humans and other animals can't do that. Lying in the sun breathing, while eating dirt and drinking water won't do it for us. If we are to live and grow, we need the organized molecules — proteins, fats, and carbohydrates — that the plants have manufactured for us. Other animals also live on plants — and each other. Eating a mix of plants and animals, they get what they need to grow optimally. For perhaps a million years, humans survived in much the same way, on the plants and animals that they could wrest from their own immediate environments. They were often hungry, sometimes starving. But nutrition per se was not their problem. They ate what they could find — learned, perhaps, over time to search especially hard for certain "nutritious" foods — and eating from the natural world kept them alive. But today, we have the supermarket. A young child, seated in a grocery cart as it moves down aisle after dazzling aisle, would find it daunting to connect the colorful packages she sees with anything in the natural world; and so would her parents! The products that turn up on supermarket shelves seem to have been constructed not from plants, but from "ingredients" that have themselves been manufactured somewhere "out there." To trace the origins of Froot Loops that have no fruits, and chocolate creme pies that have neither cream nor chocolate would defy most adults. For most children, as we know, to imagine back from the supermarket to the real source of foods is all but impossible. This is not an accident. The manufacturers of the products filling the shelves profit most from foods with the least obvious relationship to the Earth. More than 25 years ago, a food-industry analyst, commenting on processors' vulnerability to rising costs, noted that "The further a product's identity moves from a specific raw material — that is, the more processing steps involved — the less vulnerable is its processor." More than 25 years later, the supermarket aisles are filled with products so far removed from anything nature produces that even that analyst might have been surprised. Food products come and go on supermarket shelves at a rate that is exhausting even to think about. Throughout the 1990s, an average of 15,000 new food products a year — more than 40 a day in some years — entered the marketplace and an almost equal number failed and left. And we buy these products — pushed by advertising, we even buy them for our children. Why? Here is a food technologist describing how to make a product that will tempt us : To have staying power, a food of the future must have one or more of the following: decreased calories; decreased saturated fat; no transfatty acids; poly- and monounsaturated fats in place of other fats; reduced cholesterol; reduced salt; reduced sugar; increased dietary fiber; no artificial colors, MSG, or other additives, no pesticides; no pathogens; increased natural antioxidants and anticarcinogens; no growth hormones; no genetically modified components; a long shelf life with no loss of nutrients, etc. &support_txt3=More Plants &support_txt4=Botanical Plants 197. Avengia gabonensis Seeds 198. Lophira lanceolata Seeds 199. Mammea Africana Seeds 200. Pentadessma butyraceum Seeds 201. Sesamum indicum Seeds 202. Tieghella heckelii Seeds 203. Vitellaria paradoxa Seeds 204. Cissampelos owariensis 205. Quassia amara 206. Desmodium adscendens 207. Adianthum spp. 208. Momordica charantia 209. Phyllanthus niruri 210. Mirabilis jalapa 211. Cassia accidentalis 212. Stachytarpheta spp 213. Paullinia cupana 214. Physelis andulata 215. Bidens pilosa 216. Scoparia dulcis 217. Centella asiastica 218. Mallotus oppositifolia 219. Mitragyna sp 220. Cocos nuicfera fruit 221. Aspillia sp 222. Argyreia Nevosa 223. Combretum micranthum 224. Bambusa arundinacea 225. Corynathe sp 226. Mucana pruriens 227. Walthoria Indica 228. Leonotis nepetifolia 229. Harungana madascarienses 230. Catharanthus roseus 231. Okuobaka Bark. 232. Erythroxylum mannii 233. Jasmimum sambac 234. Lippia adoensis 235. Lippia multiflora 236. Acacia albida 237. Afraegle paniculata 238. Anthocleista nobilis 239. Cocos nucifera 240. Dracaena arborea 241. Erythrina milbraedii 242. Sterculia rhinopetala 243. Adansonia digitata 244. Mammea Africana 245. Blighia sapida 246. Bussea occidentalis Pod Ashes 247. Theobroma cacao Pod Ashes 248. Prosopis Africana Pod Ashes 249. Samanea dinklagei Pod Ashes 250. Xylia evansii Pod Ashes 251. Trumfetta cordifolia Pod Ashes 252. Annona muricata 253. Cocos nuicfera Fruit 254. Vernonia nigritana (milk coagulant) 255. Aframomum melegueta Seeds 256. Citrus species Fruit Rind 257. Zingeiber offinale Rhizomes 258. Cananga odorata Petals 259. Cymbopogon nardus Leaves 260. Cymbopogon citradus Leaves 261. Hyptis suaveolens Leaves 262. Cinnamomum camphora Bark, Leaves 263. cinnamomum 264. zeylanicum Bark, Leaves 265. Vetiveria zizanioides Roots 266. Ocimum gratissimum 267. Piper guineense 268. Hoslundia opposite 269. Eugenia calyophillate 270. Corynanthe pachycers Bark 271. Penianthus zenkeri roots 272. Sphenocentrum jollyanum Roots 273. Paullina pinnata Roots 274. Cyperus escuentus Nuts 275. Massularia acuminate roots 276. Carissa edulis roots 277. Rauvolfia vomitoria Roots, Barks 278. Tribulus terrestris Whole Plant 279. Cleame viscose roots 280. Anthonotha macraphyll Red 281. Strychnos afzelii Red 282. Phyllam reticylatus Red 283. Bix orellana Pinkish Red 284. Cochlospermum tinctorium Green 285. Indigofera arecta Indigo 286. Lanchocarpus cyanescens Indigo blue 287. Lanchocarpus laxiflorus Indigo Blue 288. Tamarindus indica Brown 289. Lawsonia inermis Pinkish Red 290. Anacardium occidentale (leaves) Yellow 291. Anogeissus leiocarpus (leaves) Yellow 292. Enantia polycarpa (bark, extract) Yellow 293. Gossypium arboretum (flowers) yellow 294. Punica granatum (Fruit, Bark) Yellow 295. Pterocarpus erinaceus (bark, wool, roots) Purple 296. Parkia biglobosa Indigo Blue 297. Cremaspora triflora Blue 298. Clitoria ternatea Blue 299. Saba florida Blue 300. Buchnera leptostachya Blue/Black 301. Gardenia vogelii Blue/Black 302. Khaya senegalensis brown 303. Entandrophragma angolense brown 304. Trema orientalis brown 305. Maesa lanceolata Brown 306. Afrormosia elata 307. Afzelia Africana 308. Afzelia bella 309. Albizia ferruginea 310. Albizia zygia 311. Alchornea cordifolia 312. Alchornea floribunda 313. Allanblackia floribunda 314. Alstonia boonei 315. Amphimas pterocarpoides 316. Aningeria altissima 317. Aningeria robusta 318. Anopyxis klaineana 319. Antiaris toxicaria 320. Antrocaryon micraster 321. Berlinia spp 322. Bombax brevicuspe 323. Bombax buonopozense 324. Canarium schweinfurthii 325. Cedrela odorata 326. Ceiba pentandra 327. Celtis mildbraedii 328. Celtis zenkeri 329. Chlorophora excels 330. Chlorophora regia 331. Chrysophyllum aibidum 332. Chrysophyllum giganteum 333. Chrysophyllum subnudum 334. Cistanthera papaverifera 335. Clausena anisata 336. Cleistopholis patents 337. Combretodendron africanum 338. Cola boxiana 339. Cola digitata 340. Cola nitada 341. Copaifera salikounda 342. Cordial millenii 343. Cordial platythyrsa 344. Cylicodiscus gabunensis 345. Cynometra ananta 346. Daniellia ogea 347. Daniellia ogea 348. Daniellia thurifera 349. Dialium aubrevillei 350. Diospyros spp. 351. Distemonanthus benthamianus 352. Dumoria heckelii 353. Entandrophragma angolense 354. Entandrophragma candollei 355. Entandrophragma cylindricum 356. Entandrophragma utile 357. Erythrophleum africanum 358. Erythrophleum guineense 359. Erythrophleum ivorense 360. Ficus spp. 361. Gilbertiodendron spp. 362. Gmelina arborea 363. Guarea cedrata 364. Guarea thompsonii 365. Guibourtia ehie 366. Heritiera utilis 367. Holoptelea grandis 368. Khaya ivorensis 369. Klainedoxa gabonensis 370. Lannea wewitschii 371. Lophira alata 372. Lophira pocera 373. Lovoa klaineana 374. Lovoa trichilioides 375. Mammea Africana 376. Manilkara spp. 377. Mansonia altissima 378. Milicia excelsa 379. Milicia regia 380. Mimusops heckelii 381. Morus mesozygia 382. Nauclea diderrichii 383. Nesogordonia papaverifera 384. Okoubaka aubrevillei 385. Ongokea gore 386. Parinari excelsa 387. Parinari holstii 388. Parkia bicolor 389. Pentaclethra macrophylla 390. Pericopsis elata 391. Petersia Africana 392. Petersianthus macrocarpus 393. Piptadenia Africana 394. Piptadeniastrum africanum 395. Pterygota macrocarpa 396. Pycnanthus angolensis 397. Sacoglottis gabonensis 398. Sarcocephalus diderrichii 399. Scottellia coriacea 400. Scottellia klaineana 401. Sterculia oblonga 402. Sterculia rhinopetala 403. Strombosia glaucescens 404. Stombosia pustulata 405. Tarrietia utilis 406. Tectona grandis 407. Terminalia ivorensis 408. Terminalia superba 409. Tieghemelia heckelii 410. Terminalia Sericea Rootbarks 411. Ginkgo biloba 412. Cimicifuga Racemosa 413. Commiphora Mukul 414. Piper methysticum 415. Urtica Dioica 416. Passiflora Incalnata 417. Cucurbita Species 418. Valeriana Officinalis 419. Salix Aba 420. Dioscorea Villosa 421. Pygeum Africanum (Prunus Africana) 422. Xylopia aethiopica fruits 423. Mandora myristica Seeds 424. Aframomum melegueta Seeds 425. Piper guineese Fruits 426. Zingeiber offincinale Rhizomes 427. Capsicum annum Fruit 428. Myristica fragrans seeds and Mace 429. Curcuma domestica Rhizomes 430. Tetrapleura tetraptera Fruits 431. Lantana meamsi seed 432. Monodora tenuifolia Seed 433. Xylopia parviflora Seed 434. Tribulus Terrestris 435. Todalia Asiatica 436. Artemisia annua/caffra/others 437. Memordia charitia (dritter lemon) 438. Pausinystalia Tohimbe 439. Ruta Graveolens 440. Boerhavia diffusa 441. Lippia Javanica 442. Vebena officinalis 443. Stringing Nettle 444. Urtica dioica 445. Cinnamon Barks 446. Tumeric roots (curcumin) 447. 2-arginine Grandiflorum 448. Glycyrrhiza glabra 449. Ura, Ursi Leaves 450. Angelica roots 451. Comiphera Makeel gum 452. St. Johnswort &support_txt6=Humans and other animals can't do that. Lying in the sun breathing, while eating dirt and drinking water won't do it for us. If we are to live and grow, we need the organized molecules — proteins, fats, and carbohydrates — that the plants have manufactured for us. &support_txt7=...wonders of plants &support_txt8="..Using only energy from the sun, they can take up all the nourishment they need — water, minerals, carbon dioxide — directly from the world around them to manufacture their own roots and stems, leaves and flowers, fruits and seeds. If something is missing from that simple mix — if they don't get enough water, for example, or if the soil is lacking some of the minerals they need — they grow poorly or die. But their diet is limited, a few minerals, some H2O, some CO2, and energy from the sun. Humans and other animals can't do that. Lying in the sun breathing, while eating dirt and drinking water won't do it for us. If we are to live and grow, we need the organized molecules — proteins, fats, and carbohydrates — that the plants have manufactured for us. Other animals also live on plants — and each other. Eating a mix of plants and animals, they get what they need to grow optimally. For perhaps a million years, humans survived in much the same way, on the plants and animals that they could wrest from their own immediate environments. They were often hungry, sometimes starving. But nutrition per se was not their problem. They ate what they could find — learned, perhaps, over time to search especially hard for certain "nutritious" foods — and eating from the natural world kept them alive. But today, we have the supermarket. A young child, seated in a grocery cart as it moves down aisle after dazzling aisle, would find it daunting to connect the colorful packages she sees with anything in the natural world; and so would her parents! The products that turn up on supermarket shelves seem to have been constructed not from plants, but from "ingredients" that have themselves been manufactured somewhere "out there." To trace the origins of Froot Loops that have no fruits, and chocolate creme pies that have neither cream nor chocolate would defy most adults. For most children, as we know, to imagine back from the supermarket to the real source of foods is all but impossible. This is not an accident. The manufacturers of the products filling the shelves profit most from foods with the least obvious relationship to the Earth. More than 25 years ago, a food-industry analyst, commenting on processors' vulnerability to rising costs, noted that "The further a product's identity moves from a specific raw material — that is, the more processing steps involved — the less vulnerable is its processor." More than 25 years later, the supermarket aisles are filled with products so far removed from anything nature produces that even that analyst might have been surprised. Food products come and go on supermarket shelves at a rate that is exhausting even to think about. Throughout the 1990s, an average of 15,000 new food products a year — more than 40 a day in some years — entered the marketplace and an almost equal number failed and left. And we buy these products — pushed by advertising, we even buy them for our children. Why? Here is a food technologist describing how to make a product that will tempt us : To have staying power, a food of the future must have one or more of the following: decreased calories; decreased saturated fat; no transfatty acids; poly- and monounsaturated fats in place of other fats; reduced cholesterol; reduced salt; reduced sugar; increased dietary fiber; no artificial colors, MSG, or other additives, no pesticides; no pathogens; increased natural antioxidants and anticarcinogens; no growth hormones; no genetically modified components; a long shelf life with no loss of nutrients, etc. &support_txt9=READ MORE &support_img1=images/fifth1.jpg& &support_img2=images/second3.jpg& &support_readmore_title1=More about Plants &support_readmore_txt1=Humans and other animals can't do that. Lying in the sun breathing, while eating dirt and drinking water won't do it for us. If we are to live and grow, we need the organized molecules — proteins, fats, and carbohydrates — that the plants have manufactured for us. Other animals also live on plants — and each other. Eating a mix of plants and animals, they get what they need to grow optimally. For perhaps a million years, humans survived in much the same way, on the plants and animals that they could wrest from their own immediate environments. They were often hungry, sometimes starving. But nutrition per se was not their problem. They ate what they could find — learned, perhaps, over time to search especially hard for certain "nutritious" foods — and eating from the natural world kept them alive. But today, we have the supermarket. A young child, seated in a grocery cart as it moves down aisle after dazzling aisle, would find it daunting to connect the colorful packages she sees with anything in the natural world; and so would her parents! The products that turn up on supermarket shelves seem to have been constructed not from plants, but from "ingredients" that have themselves been manufactured somewhere "out there." To trace the origins of Froot Loops that have no fruits, and chocolate creme pies that have neither cream nor chocolate would defy most adults. For most children, as we know, to imagine back from the supermarket to the real source of foods is all but impossible. This is not an accident. The manufacturers of the products filling the shelves profit most from foods with the least obvious relationship to the Earth. More than 25 years ago, a food-industry analyst, commenting on processors' vulnerability to rising costs, noted that "The further a product's identity moves from a specific raw material — that is, the more processing steps involved — the less vulnerable is its processor." More than 25 years later, the supermarket aisles are filled with products so far removed from anything nature produces that even that analyst might have been surprised. Food products come and go on supermarket shelves at a rate that is exhausting even to think about. Throughout the 1990s, an average of 15,000 new food products a year — more than 40 a day in some years — entered the marketplace and an almost equal number failed and left. And we buy these products — pushed by advertising, we even buy them for our children. Why? Here is a food technologist describing how to make a product that will tempt us : To have staying power, a food of the future must have one or more of the following: decreased calories; decreased saturated fat; no transfatty acids; poly- and monounsaturated fats in place of other fats; reduced cholesterol; reduced salt; reduced sugar; increased dietary fiber; no artificial colors, MSG, or other additives, no pesticides; no pathogens; increased natural antioxidants and anticarcinogens; no growth hormones; no genetically modified components; a long shelf life with no loss of nutrients, etc. ///////////// contacts //////////// &contacts_txt1=CONTACTS &contacts_txt2=Our Head Office is situated at: CONSOLIDATED INVESTMENT Building 2nd Floor Libya / Mosque Street P.O. Box 1959 Dar Es Salaam Republic of Tanzania East Africa. Mob: + 255 686 474 194, +250 784 525 807. Fax: + 255 22 211 5718 E-mail: brwezaura@
afroscaninternational.com
brwezaura@yahoo.com Website:
www.afroscaninternational.com, Skype: rwezaura.bonny
&contacts_txt3=Wonders in Plants &contacts_txt4= &contacts_txt5=Contact Form &contacts_txt6=CLEAR &contacts_txt7=SUBMIT &contacts_img1=images/second3.jpg& &file_prelouder=1&